221C Baker Street
writer, biter, blogger, fan


Natalie Dormer @ MTVu Fandom Awards, Comic-Con International (July 24, 2014)

(Source: wolfzstark)

56 seconds ago with 18 notes
via: rectumofglory source: wolfzstark
#help

Outerlands: The Series

oswinstark:

oswinstark:

THE KICKSTARTER IS UP!!!

Please spread this around as much as you can! We’re so proud of this web series and we want to be able to make the whole thing to show you! Please donate if you can and, if you can’t, spread it around to everyone you know!

You can follow the series on Twitter where I will be posting as many updates as possible.

Thank you all for your support and future support! I really appreciate all of you!

The website is: www.outerlandstheseries.com

SUPPORT MY SERIES PLEASE! Thank you to the people who donated last night. Can I get some more donations before 11AM? :D

2 minutes ago with 40 notes
via: oswinstark source: oswinstark

wouldbelovely:

itsvondell:

I suspect that Jo Rowling probably imagined James and Harry as white too, i don’t mind that, that’s her business.

Personally I’m mentally acting against the white-as-default-unless-otherwise-specified that’s pervasive in imagining media especially in predominately white fandom culture.

I’ve generally operated on a POC-unless-otherwise-noted basis with how I imagine characters. My HP headcanons aren’t What If Everybody In Harry Potter Was Black Instead Of White. They only read that way if you’re still stuck in the white-as-default zone.

James’ skin color, hair texture, etc to my knowledge has never been specified and that means to me that even a reader who strictly contains themselves within the bounds of canon is free to imagine him as any number of ethnicities.

In absence of a specified race I chose to imagine the one that makes the story most compelling to me.

In absence of a specified race I chose to imagine the one that makes the story most compelling to me.

My James is black because that creates the most personally compelling racial background for my Harry. It is informed by my interpretation of the canon interactions between the Potters and the Evans/Dursleys, whom Jo Rowling and I probably imagine very similarly. It is informed by my experience as the black mixed-race child of a black man and a white woman who grew up more or less estranged from both my parents largely in the care of my white maternal aunt and her family, household, values, and prejudices. It is informed by my personal desire for a black mixed-race hero story.

Probably most important to me, my desire to create and disseminate content that involves non-white interpretations of popularly-imagined-white-by-default characters reflects my desire to speak to people like me, who are not used to seeing faces like theirs represented in the popular media they consume. It reflects my fight against white-as-default. It reflects my desire to contribute to young people of color feeling empowered by popular fiction and not othered by it. It reflects my desire not to let blockbuster casting directors dictate what you may or may not imagine the characters that populate your fiction to be.

It’s not arbitrary and it doesn’t come from nowhere, but if it did, that would be fine too. All my interpretations are based squarely in canon. But if they weren’t, that would be damn well acceptable. Squeeze representation out of anywhere you can feel it and fabricate the rest. Own your fiction.

The James as black headcanon not only works, it adds a whole different depth to the story. First off, Vernon’s intenser hatred for James than Lily, The whole Pure-Race dogma of the death eaters, the fact that James, though pureblood, didn’t seem to have any Death Eater family members like Sirius did. 

Then Harry as mixed, the teasing he got at school, the fact that he was never mistaken for an actual relative of the Dursley’s in public. His black uncontrollable hair that his white family had NO IDEA how to deal with. His eyes were always considered striking though it’s not an unusual color for whites. 

Screw it, headcanon accepted. 

54 minutes ago with 15,771 notes
via: ghivashels source: itsvondell
#hp

lavender-ice:

on my way to the emergency room

(Source: ukdb)

tamorapierce:

aliasofwestgate:

justira:

Reblogging not just because special effects are cool but because body doubles, stunt doubles, acting doubles, talent doubles — all the people whose faces we’re not supposed to see but whose bodies make movies and tv shows possible — these people need and deserve more recognition. We see their bodies onscreen, delight in the shape and motion of those bodies, but even as we pick apart everything else that goes on both on and behind the screen, I just don’t see the people who are those bodies getting the love and recognition they deserve.

We’re coming to love and recognize actors who work in full-body makeup/costumes, such as Andy Serkis, or actors whose entire performances, or large chunks thereof, are motion captured or digitized (lately sometimes also Andy Serkis!). But people like Leander Deeny play an enormous part in making characters such as Steve Rogers come to life, too. Body language is a huge part of a performance and of characterization. For characters/series with a lot of action, a stunt person can have a huge influence on how we read and interpret a character, such as the influence Heidi Moneymaker has had on the style and choreography of Black Widow’s signature fighting style. Talent doubles breathe believability and discipline-specific nuance into demanding storylines.

Actors are creative people themselves, and incredibly important in building the characters we see onscreen. But if we agree that they’re more than dancing monkeys who just do whatever the directors/writers say, then we have to agree that doubles are more than that, too. Doubles make creative decisions too, and often form strong, mutually supportive relationship with actors.

image image

Image 1: “I would like to thank Kathryn Alexandre, the most generous actor I’ve ever worked opposite.”

Image 2: “Kathryn who’s playing my double who’s incredible.”

[ Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany on her acting double, Kathryn Alexandre, two images from a set on themarysue, via lifeofkj ]

image image

image image

I’ve got a relationship that goes back many, many years with Dave. And I would hate for people to just see that image of me and Dave and go, “oh, there’s Dan Radcliffe with a person in a wheelchair.” Because I would never even for a moment want them to assume that Dave was anything except for an incredibly important person in my life.

[ Daniel Radcliffe talking about David Holmes, his stunt double for 2001-2009, who was paralysed while working on the Harry Potter films. David Holmes relates his story here. Gifset via smeagoled ]

With modern tv- and film-making techniques, many characters are composite creations. The characters we see onscreen or onstage have always been team efforts, with writers, directors, makeup artists, costume designers, special effects artists, production designers, and many other people all contributing to how a character is ultimately realized in front of us. Many different techniques go into something like the creation of Skinny Steve — he’s no more all Leander Deeny than he is all Chris Evans.

But as fandom dissects the anatomy of scenes in ever-increasing detail to get at microexpressions and the minutiae of body language, let’s recognize the anatomy in the scenes, too. I don’t mean to take away from the work Chris Evans or any other actors do (he is an amazing Steve Rogers and I love him tons), but fandom needs to do better in recognizing the bodies, the other people, who make up the characters we love and some of our very favourite shots of them. Chris Evans has an amazing body, but so does Leander Deeny — that body is beautiful; that body mimicked Chris Evans’s motions with amazing, skilled precision; that body moved Steve Rogers with emotion and grace and character.

Fandom should do better than productions and creators who fail to be transparent about the doubles in their productions. On the screen, suspension of disbelief is key and the goal is to make all the effort that went into the production vanish and leave only the product itself behind. But when the film is over and the episode ends, let’s remember everyone who helped make that happen.

image

[ Sam Hargrave (stunt double for Chris Evans) and James Young (stunt double for Sebastian Stan, and fight choreographer), seen from behind, exchange a fistbump while in costume on the set of Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Image via lifeofkj ]

I applaud these guys as much as the suit actors in my japanese tokusatsu shows. They do just as much work. 

Hat’s off to them, and my thanks for all they do.

(Source: stark-industries-rnd)

penguinlass:

awwww-cute:

He jumped in and meowed until i closed the door, maybe he thinks he is going in to space

Ground control to major Tom

plantcreep:

i want girls to question their sexuality over me and boys to fear me and animals to love me

4 hours ago with 112,330 notes
via: goblinparty source: plantcreep

jeankd:

astudyinjade:

A dick with a future

A dick with a 401k plan and retirement benefits.

blacktinabelcher:

(Source: mrgolightly)

On New Year’s Day, we are heading out to brunch, and Kavya’s sitting on the stairs, her head in her hands. Crying. I ask her what happened. In most cases, we verbally abuse the pain-inflicting object, followed immediately by a good stomping, and that sorts things out. But this time is different. In-between muted, heaving sobs, she says something that I hadn’t expected for at least a few more years: “I want yellow hair. Like Rapunzel.” She points to the large, manga-eyed, blonde princess with tiny toothpick-wrists, smiling on her t-shirt.

It’s one of those parenting moments where time stands still. I fight the urge to say, “Rapunzel’s hair is stupid. She can go to hell.”

My wife, Sona, sits on the stairs with Kavya and tries to comfort her. Sona’s parents don’t really understand the heaviness of what Kavya is saying, and view it as just a random tantrum.

Instead of berating Rapunzel for her physical appearance, I ask Kavya if she knows who my favourite princess is. She looks up at me. “Who?”

“Princess Kavya.” I say, touching her nose. She starts crying even louder. After a bit, she says, “Why do you like Princess Kavya?”


Challenging “Normal”: Why Non-Token Diversity in Kids’ Storytelling Is Important

Navdeep Singh Dhillon argues that, all too often in books, movies, and TV shows for children, non-white characters are only defined by their “otherness.”

(via tubooks)

7 hours ago with 2,093 notes
via: madmaudlingoes source: tubooks